Tag: Sara Jeannette Duncan

Not Getting Married

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age by Mandy Treagus (University of Adelaide Press 2014) is an academic study of three novels: Olive Schreiner’s The Story of an African Farm (1883), Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Daughter for Today (1894), […]

Ashtead

Lit Trip: Duncan’s Grave

People flock to Westminster Abbey to visit the Poet’s Corner, where writers are either buried or have a memorial. What is the satisfaction of these literary pilgrimmages? I too indulge in this weird pleasure. When better to visit the burial […]

English Winter

Wednesday noon the weather in London today is 5 degrees celcius and 83% humidity with a chance of rain at 10%, cloudy skies. According to the Met office, the weather in February 1905 was about the same, in a winter […]

Rich Wives

In the National Portrait Gallery, in the room called Expansion and Empire, there is a small display: “Old Titles and New Money: American Heiresses and the British Aristocracy,” showing until August 1, 2015. (Copyright protected portraits can be seen on […]

Colonial Moderns

Review of Modernist Voyages: Colonial Women Writers in London, 1890-1945 by Anna Snaith, Cambridge University Press 2014, 278 pp hardcover (ISBN: 9780521515450). Reviewed by Debra Martens. Modernism is loosely defined as the period between the Victorian and the Second World […]

Books, prizes and survey

Half of voters who did the survey were against, and half minus one were in favour of Catton’s novel being in competition for the GG’s Lit Award. There you go. It you are born in Canada but don’t live here, […]

Place and the Blues

“My lifelong involvement with Mrs. Dempster began at 5:58 o’clock p.m. on the 27th of December, 1908, at which time I was ten year and seven months old. I am able to date the occasion with complete certainty because that […]

The Innocent Traveller

There is nothing quite like poking about second-hand bookshops while on vacation. I was looking for anything by Sara Jeannette Duncan. Instead I found Ethel Wilson’s first novel, The Innocent Traveller. The cover of this 1960 edition is lovely, with […]

The Future Margaret Laurence Wanted

Are you disappointed by the results of Rio+20, the U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development? Here are some uplifting words from a wise woman who once lived in Knightsbridge, not far from here. This is from her memoir Dance on the […]

Jubilee and Dialect

In my last post I tried to start a discussion on the use of dialect and idiom in fiction. I expected people to exclaim Faulkner! and James Joyce! in the comments – those masters of voice. Although the teachers in […]

Exploration and Empire

For the past two Monday evenings I have fallen asleep in front of the BBC program “Empire.” During “Making Ourselves at Home,” on March 5, host Jeremy Paxman went to various countries of the empire, including Canada. I perked up […]

Boffin

In the last episode of the BBC Sherlock series, “The Reichenbach Fall,” the viewer sees the newspaper headline “Boffin Sherlock Solves Another.” Sherlock tosses the newspaper aside, saying in disgust, “Boffin Sherlock Holmes.” Watson, meanwhile, sits back with a newspaper […]

Sara Jeannette Duncan 2

It was easier than I thought it would be to find where Sara Jeannette Duncan lived in Chelsea — or, actually, Mrs Everard Cotes. Yesterday, at the public library of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, I checked two […]

Sara Jeannette Duncan

It’s time to talk about writers who lived abroad. I want to start with a Canadian writer who left home to write and never moved back. She was given the name Sarah Janet Duncan, but she didn’t write under it, […]