Margaret Laurence

Yes, the Margaret Laurence whose books they forced you to read in high school, which they really shouldn’t have done. The Margaret Laurence who wandered far from her home in […]

photo: Sheila Coutts

Respirer et écrire

I have been thinking about Sara Jeanette Duncan lately. I should be thinking about her work, but I’ve been thinking about her. OK, when I cough (a lingering cold), I […]

Sharing

I thought I would share with you some of the great resources I come across in my research for Canadian Writers Abroad. I found the two below while doing photo […]

Would it be best for you if you left the country?

I thought I would follow up on Margaret Atwood’s comment in the last post, that up to the 1960s, if you were a writer in Canada who wanted an international […]

The Reason

When I was doing research this summer, I was surprised to find that so many pre-1970s Canadian writers had studied or worked abroad. Here is Margaret Atwood’s explanation for this: […]

Douglas LePan

Startled by George Monbiot’s dire observations on the melting of Arctic ice in “The Heat of the Moment” in the Guardian this morning, I have decided to post a poem […]

A Little Light Reading on my Vacation

When I was book editor for the Varsity newspaper at the University of Toronto, I reviewed a dictionary. This outraged the Review editor so much that I still remember his […]

The Innocent Traveller

There is nothing quite like poking about second-hand bookshops while on vacation. I was looking for anything by Sara Jeannette Duncan. Instead I found Ethel Wilson’s first novel, The Innocent […]

The Future Margaret Laurence Wanted

Are you disappointed by the results of Rio+20, the U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development? Here are some uplifting words from a wise woman who once lived in Knightsbridge, not far […]

Love Literary London

There are many things to love about London, but my favourite is its celebration of literature. Besides theatre, Sherlock and Doctor Who. Dead authors appear on blue plaques on walls […]

T.C. Haliburton and the Olympics

The London Chapter of the Haliburton Society is joining the Olympics, in the same way that the Cultural Olympiad is running in parallel with the London 2012 Olympic Games. It’s […]

Jubilee and Dialect

In my last post I tried to start a discussion on the use of dialect and idiom in fiction. I expected people to exclaim Faulkner! and James Joyce! in the […]

Once You Break

Once You Break a Knuckle by D.W. Wilson has twelve stories and for that simple reason I will make twelve points in my review. This book is a must read. […]

The Orange Prize for Fiction

At the end of this month, the last winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction will be announced. The prize has been around since 1996, and is given to celebrate […]

2 on 1

Two Canadian writers on the same page this morning in the Guardian Review. The first is a very positive review by John Burnside of D.W. Wilson’s Once You Break a […]

Sara and Edward

I linger’d; all within was noise Of songs, and clapping hands, and boys That crash’d the glass and beat the floor; Where once we held debate, a band Of youthful […]

Screenplays and Scriptwriters

How did I get here? I don’t even write film scripts. Well, I haven’t written my Wilson book review, and I haven’t done my Smart research, so I was searching […]

Le Mas Blanc and Isabel Huggan

I am happy to be able to offer you this interview with Isabel Huggan about the writing retreat she has recently opened at Le Mas Blanc. A Canadian writer of […]

Big and Small

By big and small I don’t mean the play of the same name with Cate Blanchett. I mean Tuesday, when I went to the oversized London Book Fair at Earls […]